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A U.S. government weather forecaster said on Thursday that La Niña conditions are likely to persist through the Northern Hemisphere winter.

La Niña is characterized by unusually cold ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and is linked with floods and droughts. It is the opposite phase of what is known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle.

The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) in its monthly forecast pegged the chance of La Niña developing at about 85 to 95 percent, with a transition to ENSO-neutral expected during the spring.

“Based on the latest observations and forecast guidance, forecasters believe this weak-to-moderate La Niña is currently peaking and will eventually weaken into the spring,” the agency said.

The agency last month projected the chance of the phenomenon developing through the Northern Hemisphere winter at about 80 percent, with a transition to ENSO-neutral most likely during the mid-to-late spring.

La Niña emerged in 2016 for the first time since 2012, before fading in early 2017.

Please enjoy the full article below;

https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2018/01/12/477026.htm

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Some coastal residents always put off emergency preparations until storm clouds loom on the horizon. The National Hurricane Center is going to try giving those people a deadline this year, issuing experimental advisories showing when tropical-storm force winds may hit particular communities to help them understand when it’s too late to put up storm shutters or evacuate.

The forecasters’ advisories will be fueled by more data than ever, thanks to new weather satellites and an expanded network of underwater gliders.

New Advisory

To help people understand when storm preparations should be completed, the hurricane center will experiment with advisories showing the times when sustained tropical-storm force winds are estimated to hit land. If a tropical disturbance nears shore, forecasters also could post advisories or warnings before it develops into a tropical depression or named storm.

Florida’s emergency management director, Bryan Koon, said the new advisories could help validate evacuation orders for people who complain about “hype” around approaching storms.

“We can say, `Listen, this is when things are going to get bad in your area,”’ Koon said. “We can also use that to say, `A few hours ahead of that, stores are going to close, roads are going to get jam-packed with people, we might have to shut down power substations.”

Storm surge watches and warnings will be issued this year when U.S. coastlines are at risk for life-threatening flooding.

Please enjoy the full article below;

http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/southeast/2017/06/07/453709.htm